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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 14, Locke's Political Philosophy Summary & Analysis

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Book 3: Chapter 14, Locke's Political Philosophy Summary and Analysis

Between 1689 and 1690 Locke wrote two Treatises on Government. He was the first to criticize the right to hereditary power in response to Sir Robert Filmer's "Patriarcha: or The Natural Power of Kings" published in 1680, supporting the divine right of kings.

"Patriarcha" advocated combating common opinion that men were naturally free and could choose any form of government.

Filmer claimed political power from the authority of the father in relation to children. Source of regal authority was part of the dependence of children on parents. Patriarchs in Genesis were monarchs, while kings derived from Adam. Such view seemed hard to maintain and only practices in Japan may have adhered to such view while still upheld as part of Egyptian and Mexican customs. They were rejected in England mainly due to various religious practices and...

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This section contains 535 words
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