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A Girl Named Disaster Social Sensitivity

Nancy Farmer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 85 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Girl Named Disaster.
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Social Sensitivity

Farmer's sensitivity for the peoples of Africa is one of respect, admiration, and affection for the Shona culture. She is never patronizing and seldom critical. When she does express a negative view about an aspect of the traditional life—bride bartering— she is careful to put the criticism in the mouths of native characters rather than white characters. While she sometimes criticizes personal behavior, she also explains the motivation for it and spreads the bad behavior fairly among native and white characters. Readers get a negative view of the jealous aunt and the nouveau riche relatives who imitate European practices, but they also hear criticism of the white settlers who colonized Zimbabwe and Mozambique. Farmer is also careful about the connotations of words. She does not want to play to any stereotypes her American readers may have picked up about Africa. Instead of witch doctors, she...

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This section contains 321 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Girl Named Disaster Study Guide
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A Girl Named Disaster from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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