A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock - Study Guide Chapter 11, Transposition Rediscovered Summary & Analysis

Evelyn Fox Keller
This Study Guide consists of approximately 24 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Feeling for the Organism.
This section contains 718 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock Study Guide

Molecular biology saved the gene, but only by bringing about an excessive reductionism within genetics. Many began to focus on the question of how genes copied themselves. No one yet knew how cells deriving from a single egg differentiated despite having the same DNA.

McClintock spent time in the 1950s listening to all of these new findings, but she maintained a certain distance. She denied the central dogma of that day, that DNA would explain everything. Her Ds-Ac system of regulation and control could not be fully explained at DNA's level of nature. She argued that the transposition she found in corn could be found elsewhere in nature. The geneticist community had reached an apparent consensus that excluded McClintock's ideas but this was not so in Russia where Lysenko aimed to resurrect Lamarckian evolutionary theory, a contrast to Darwin's view. During...

(read more from the Chapter 11, Transposition Rediscovered Summary)

This section contains 718 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.