A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock - Chapter 10, Molecular Biology Summary & Analysis

Evelyn Fox Keller
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The 1950s brought about the revolution of molecular biology; but this produced a crisis in classical genetics, opening the door to another revolution. Many were concerned about the concept of a gene. Chromosomal studies flourished in the '40s, and many were convinced that genes were real, but the '50s brought the very concept into question. Geneticists did not even understand what a mutation was. During this conflict, McClintock's work on transposition was welcome. The '50s brought a re-examination of McClintock's work. Geneticists began to focus on bacterial DNA; the gene became less mysterious over time, understood as a genuine molecular object. Many sciences converged to bring this about - biochemistry, microbiology, X-ray crystallography and physics. This led to the creation of molecular biology, which began with enormous enthusiasm, with the prospect of 'explaining life' seemingly at its fingertips.

A student of Niels Bohr, Max Delbruck, organized a...

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This section contains 334 words
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Buy the A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock Study Guide
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