A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock - Chapter 8, Transposition Summary & Analysis

Evelyn Fox Keller
This Study Guide consists of approximately 24 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Feeling for the Organism.
This section contains 469 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock Study Guide

McClintock continues her experimentation on plants at Cold Spring Harbor. She has developed some unusual mutations in plants with a high degree of genetic instability. The maize she grew had varied colors, each splotch of which represented division from a single mutated cell. The number of patches of a particular size indicated the frequency of mutation during the seed's development. The appearance of the corn allowed McClintock to generate a history of the seed's development. She found that if a plant exhibited a high rate of mutation early in its development, that it would maintain this rate of mutation throughout its life - this held for high and low levels of mutation. McClintock knew then that something was regulating the mutation rate. She was one of the first to discover this phenomenon, and became obsessed with understanding the mechanism of control. This led...

(read more from the Chapter 8, Transposition Summary)

This section contains 469 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.