Frank Wedekind Writing Styles in A Children's Tragedy

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Point of View

The play is shown to the viewer from the perspective of the adolescents. Although Melchior is the main character, many of the scenes do not contain him. On one level, the main character can be identified as the adolescents as a group, instead of Melchior as an individual, and the audience sees the children's perspective on the unfolding events. Adults are always distant, secretive, and oppressive. The world outside the company of other adolescents is confusing and obscure. The sequence of scenes, sometimes disjointed, sometimes failing to show important events, reflects the confusion of adolescence.

The characters are all experiencing turmoil, and each processes this turmoil in his or her own way. Wendla is excited by the new prospects opening up for her, but she does not understand their significance. She lets her excitement run away with her and begins having masochistic fantasies. Moritz is afraid...

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This section contains 1,024 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Children's Tragedy Study Guide
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