A Canticle for Leibowitz Quotes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 74 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Canticle for Leibowitz.
This section contains 1,110 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Canticle for Leibowitz Study Guide

"His desire to profess his final and perpetual vows - was it not akin to the motive of the cat who became an ornithologist? - so that he might glorify his own ornithophagy, esoterically devouring Penthestes atricapillus but never eating chickadees. For as the cat was called by Nature to be an ornithophage, so was Francis called by his own nature hungrily to devour such knowledge as could be taught in those days, and, because there were no schools but the monastic schools, he had donned the habit first of a postulant, later of a novice. But to suspect that God as well as Nature had beckoned him to become a professed monk of the Order?" Chapter 5, pg. 52.

"'You,' Arkos rubbed his chin and seemed lost in unhappy speculation. 'I can see it too clearly. The Leibowitz cause is shelved. Poor Brother is struck down by a falling...

(read more)

This section contains 1,110 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Canticle for Leibowitz Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A Canticle for Leibowitz from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.