A Beginner's Guide to Constructing the Universe: Mathematical Archetypes of Nature, Art, and Science - Chapter Three: Triad - Three-Part Harmony Summary & Analysis

Michael S. Schneider
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Chapter Three: Triad - Three-Part Harmony Summary and Analysis

One, Two, Through

Sir Percival of King Arthur's Round Table found the Holy Grail. He was able to break through the mountains and find the treasure when no one else could. The name Percival, means "pierce the valley." He also pierced polarity which is something we do whenever we count past one and two. By attaining "three" we pass the polarized threshold of two.

Three Cheers! (Not Two or Four)

Triads, or series of threes, appear everywhere in our lives: beginning, middle and end; birth, life and death; length, width and height. We have three daily meals. A traffic light has red, green and yellow lights. "Ready, get set, go!" "Three strikes and you're out!" The Olympics awards Gold, Silver and Bronze medals. In religious terms, Christianity is based on the...

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This section contains 710 words
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