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Literary Precedents for Work: A Story of Experience

This Study Guide consists of approximately 12 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Work.
This section contains 345 words
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The most immediately recognizable influence upon the novel's structure and theme of spiritual self-fulfillment is John Bunyan's allegorical Pilgrim's Progress, finalized in 1684, which traces the moral journey of a hero named Christian to a heavenly Celestial City. Alcott's heroine has a similar name and, particularly in early chapters, shows steps of progress made through moral lessons. Alcott's indebtedness to Bunyan's allegory is reflected in numerous depictions of temptations overcome and resting-spots along Christie's spiritual way, and in such prose as "God was very patient with her, sending much help, and letting her climb up to Him by all the tender ways in which aspiring souls can lead unhappy hearts."

A painting of a scene from Pilgrim's Progress figures in Work, showing Christie's relationship to Bunyan's hero. Hepsey, Mrs. Sterling, and Rachel /Letty behold the painting and marvel at resemblances to David and little Pansy. Nevertheless...

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This section contains 345 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Work: A Story of Experience Short Guide
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