William Faulkner's Short Fiction Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 12 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of William Faulkner's Short Fiction.
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Most of Faulkner's stories deal with one of a few subjects: stories of Southern country people, Mississippi Indian stories, stories of Southern small town life, and war stories from the Civil War and World War I. Although there are stories with different subjects, few are among his best. Prominent social concerns in these stories include conflicts between traditional and modern cultures, war, and racism.

Perhaps the main social concern of Faulkner's stories is the plight of the individual in a mass, technological society. Individuals, families, and small communities of friends and neighbors are shown to have great dignity and integrity, but larger groups such as nations and races are shown to corrupt individuals and to feed on compulsions that threaten the humanity of their members. Faulkner's stories often include a transition from a traditional family-based culture to a modern, more commercial culture. Although each has its...

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This section contains 587 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the William Faulkner's Short Fiction Short Guide
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William Faulkner's Short Fiction from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.