Writing Techniques in The Waltz

This Study Guide consists of approximately 7 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Waltz.
This section contains 345 words
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In an interior monologue, an author must create a character through voice alone. Parker uses humor, sarcasm, and exaggeration in the internal voice of "The Waltz" to illustrate the wit, intelligence, and expectations of the narrator. The strength of this voice helps to set up the story's surprise ending—her willingness to go on dancing—which in turn recalls the old adage, "actions speak louder than words." If that were all the story had to offer, we would consider it clever, but not important. Other elements raise this story to the level of allegory.

Setting is particularly significant. The setting is much narrower than the room in which the dance takes place. The dance itself, the embrace of the two partners, is the setting. Both constraint and movement are present, for the partners are "locked" together as they dance their routine pattern. This mirrors the movement of...

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This section contains 345 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Waltz Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
The Waltz from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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