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Victory Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 16 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Victory.
This section contains 430 words
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Althoug h at one time Victory was less highly regarded than some of Joseph Conrad's more famous novels, its stature as a work of art has increased over the years, as many readers have come to identify in some ways with the detachment and alienation of the central character, Axel Heyst. Despite complaints from some critics about Conrad's use of melodrama and some lapses from realism, the novel continues to exercise a certain fascination for many readers.

A major social concern of the novel is the nature of Heyst's attempt to live a life of detachment and philosophical isolation, somewhat like the tragic count in Conrad's short story "Il Conde" (1907; see separate entry). Is it possible to live such a life of solitude, apart from the sufferings of humanity? And if it is possible to do so, is such a choice morally defensible? What makes Heyst attractive to readers...

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This section contains 430 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Victory Short Guide
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