Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There Social Sensitivity

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Through the Looking-Glass does not lend itself to an in-depth analysis of social sensitivities. Carroll inadvertently develops social sensitivities as part of character definition. Issues of hierarchy, change, and loneliness emerge from his expert personification of each character.

Carroll, influenced by his family's social position, tradition in the church, and the attitudes of Victorian England, weaves the elements of hierarchy and order into his novel. More reverent than the King and Queen of Alice in Wonderland, the Red and White Kings and Queens befriend Alice and help her transition to Queen. The story exaggerates, in a clever way, the executive's power to bring order to the land.

Carroll explores the conflicts and tensions inherent in a child's world. Humpty Dumpty's severe tone, as well as the Queens'judging attitudes, challenges Alice and her beliefs. This conflict requires Alice to champion and to believe in herself. The White Knight aids...

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This section contains 413 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.