Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There Literary Qualities

This Study Guide consists of approximately 18 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Through the Looking-Glass.
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Through the Looking-Glass combines verse with prose. Two poems, in particular, have importance outside the context of the book. "Jabberwocky," that oft-quoted and memorized nonsense poem, is a mock-heroic ballad about a battle between a young man and a Jabberwock beast. The ballad form, the story line, and the use of some regular constructions provide a conventional framework for the poem. The invented and nonsensical words, however, provide the delight in the poem. Readers try to guess the meaning of the words by feel and association; with no conclusive meaning to the words, their meaning becomes whatever readers make it.

Almost as famous is the poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter" with its lines: " The time has come,' the Walrus said,/ To talk of many things:/ Of shoes—and ships—and sealing wax—/ Of cabbages—and kings—' " As the White Knight's...

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This section contains 828 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.