Writing Techniques in Tarzan of the Apes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 20 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Tarzan of the Apes.
This section contains 412 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Tarzan of the Apes Short Guide

As the characters recur, so do the plots. Burroughs wrote quickly, with a firm knowledge of what his readers wanted. In 1913, his peak year, he wrote over 400,000 words; he usually spent from one to three months on a novel, rarely rewriting except to accede to an editor's request. According to Lupoff, "His speed record for a full novel was set on Carson of Venus (1939), produced in twenty-six days," while the good Warlord of Mars (1919) took thirty days. Writing at such speed meant the use of episodic plots in which coincidences abound and logic usually disappears. Mutinies, shipwrecks, menacing beasts, sojourns in lost cities (usually paired and at war), kidnappings, rescues, chases, and wars provide all the incidents needed to keep Tarzan (and John Carter, Carson Napier, and David Innes) extremely busy. Burroughs also became adept at the cliffhanger ending — as evidenced by the conclusion of the first Tarzan...

(read more)

This section contains 412 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Tarzan of the Apes Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Tarzan of the Apes from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.