Samurai of Gold Hill Social Sensitivity

Yoshiko Uchida
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This section contains 215 words
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The sad ending is likely to disappoint some readers, but its truthfulness enhances the credibility of Uchida's account of the Gold Hill colony. In the unflinching ending, the legal authorities refuse to help the colonists, and the hostility of racism overcomes the best intentions of the Japanese and their farmer neighbors. That racism can overcome good work and good intentions is not an uplifting message, and will likely disturb some readers. Yet anger is a valid emotional response to cruel racial prejudice. In the classroom in particular, the book's ending can be useful for generating discussion about how racism sometimes overwhelms more honorable points of view, and about how a tragic conclusion may be more memorable and meaningful than a happy one.

Although Uchida is generally evenhanded in her portrait of racism, she presents the Japanese more sympathetically than she does One-eye and other anti-Japanese racists. By depicting...

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This section contains 215 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Samurai of Gold Hill Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Samurai of Gold Hill from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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