Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh Social Sensitivity

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O'Brien has stated that, "The mind learns that it is not easy to separate good from bad; they become deviously intertwined. From books [one] learns that not all doors are simply open or shut, and that even rats can become heroes." The novel depicts uses of science and knowledge, yet science is presented neither as all good nor all bad. While Nicodemus tells of the pain of scientific experimentation on animals, neither the scientists nor science itself is seen as evil. Dr. Schultz is criticized because he does not know the implications of the experiments, yet he is not inherently evil; when he holds the rats, he does so "gently but firmly." Mr. Ages is a type of doctor, who helps save Timothy's life with medicines. Moving Mrs. Frisby's home is only accomplished because the rats have knowledge that other animals do not have. The Plan, which requires...

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This section contains 278 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.