Rabbit Hill Social Sensitivity

Robert Lawson
This Study Guide consists of approximately 6 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Rabbit Hill.
This section contains 147 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rabbit Hill Short Guide

The animals on Rabbit Hill have developed a community in which all members are aware of and sensitive to the needs of the others. For example, the relationship between the fieldmouse, Willie, and the blind mole, evident in Mole's statement, "Willie, be eyes for me," suggests a cooperation that transcends differences. When preparing to enjoy the "new folk's" garden, they agree on a suitable division according to the needs of each and then enhance that agreement with a commitment to wait until Midsummer's Eve to take anything from the garden. In fact, the central tension of the book pivots on whether the "new folks" fit into this welldeveloped community structure. These "new folks" demonstrate that they are willing to take part by saving both Willie and Little Georgie and by sharing their garden with the animals. The animals respond with their own commitment to protect the garden.

(read more)

This section contains 147 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rabbit Hill Short Guide
Copyrights
Gale
Rabbit Hill from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.