Prairie-Town Boy Social Sensitivity

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Sandburg treats religion, particularly Swedish Lutheranism, with sensitivity and objectivity. He shows how his parents' faith shapes his upbringing, comments on how an immigrant landowner might view God as a farmer, and quotes the words of a zealous shoe repairman's witness. He does not, however, judge or preach. Instead he states personal beliefs vividly through his descriptions of meeting a man with no arms at the circus or through his realization that alcoholism can ruin a person's career.

Sandburg is openly sensitive to the needs and rights of blacks, and he tries to pass this sensitivity on to his readers.

But readers may be offended by some of the language Sandburg uses, such as calling the upstairs of the new auditorium a "Nigger Heaven." In using such a term, however, Sandburg is not showing prejudice but reporting a commonly-used title, just as he means no offense by relating...

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This section contains 324 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Prairie-Town Boy Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Prairie-Town Boy from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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