Pop Goes the Weasel Social Concerns

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In a Publishers Weekly interview with Andre Bernard and Jeff Zaleski, James Patterson said, "The Cross books are about nightmares that I have—not literal nightmares but nightmares that I have about the world" (1996). One of these nightmares in America is racism. Alex Cross, an African-American who grew up on the mean streets of the Southeast area of Washington, D.C., must confront racism in many guises as he works as a police detective. In fact, his boss, George Pittman, is described as "a bully, bigot, racist and careerist." Apparently, according to Patterson, cut-throat careerism is as bad as racism. But the real social problems in the novel center around Southeast, a slum area, where Geoffrey Shafer, the villain, dumps the bodies of his victims. When Shafer kills two young girls in the area, a cousin of one of the victims tells Cross, "The police won't do...

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This section contains 1,219 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Pop Goes the Weasel Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Pop Goes the Weasel from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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