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Penn Social Sensitivity

Elizabeth Gray Vining
This Study Guide consists of approximately 10 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Penn.
This section contains 195 words
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Although Penn portrays a considerable amount of conflict, the book does not contain much violence. Admiral Penn's wars occur at a distance, the sounds of cannon fire marking great victories, and Gray only summarizes young Penn's exploits in the Irish campaign. An offended Frenchman draws his sword on Penn in Paris's dark streets, but Penn merely disarms him in an almost Quakerly manner. Otherwise, the worst to occur is that violent hands are laid on Penn to arrest him or to enclose him in a courtroom cage. If anything, Gray can be faulted for making situations seem too rosy, since persecution of Quakers and other religious minorities often included brutal treatment. Gray does not hesitate, however, to show death and disease, including the horrendous London plague.

Gray's discussion of religion never becomes doctrinaire in Penn. The strongest principle asserted is religious freedom and tolerance. Despite various descriptions of...

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This section contains 195 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Penn Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Penn from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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