Mrs. Bullfrog Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 25 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Mrs. Bullfrog.
This section contains 2,715 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
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One of Hawthorne's unfortunately neglected fictions, and arguably the liveliest in his sizable collection of "marriage tales," "Mrs. Bullfrog" (1837) is refreshingly different from the bulk of his moralizing, life-rejecting stories. "Mrs. Bullfrog" not only runs counter to what the common reader would expect to find in Hawthorne, for example a keen awareness of Original Sin, it reflects an amoral viewpoint, a guiltfree, self-expedient or survivalist outlook somewhat like what is reflected in certain Edgar Allan Poe stories. However, while "Mrs. Bullfrog" is one of the small group of clearly atypical Hawthorne stories, it does show some similarity to his normative shorter fictions. For example, it is keen on giving controversial advice—to a specialized audience. But beyond the important issue of how "Mrs. Bullfrog" fits into the canon of Hawthorne's short stories, the tale has an element of whimsy suggesting mock seriousness in its comical premise and...

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This section contains 2,715 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Mrs. Bullfrog Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Mrs. Bullfrog from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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