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Literary Precedents for The M.D.: A Horror Story

This Study Guide consists of approximately 11 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The M.D..
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Horror fiction is full of self-important cliches, making it a ripe target for selfparody and outright satire. The most famous satire is almost certainly The Invisible Man, in which a mad scientist spends his time trying to frighten villagers who either ignore him or think him annoying.

Both Griffin of The Invisible Man and William are only dimly aware of the personal consequences of their actions, and they share the delusion of being greater than they are, as well as the desire for revenge upon their enemies. Both The M.D. and The Invisible Man share as a common ancestor the greatest of all madscientist tales, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818; see separate entry). Like William, Victor Frankenstein brings life to the dead, and as in The M.D. the deed brings with it great evil that visits itself on their families...

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This section contains 227 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The M.D.: A Horror Story Short Guide
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