The Lone Sentinel Social Sensitivity

Jo Dereske
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This section contains 435 words
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The major social concern in The Lone Sentinel is the way one treats others who are different from oneself. Erik treats everyone with courtesy—the visiting hunters, the space aliens, the two strange girls who appear at his door. Augusta is angry at the foster families who have feared Willa because she is different, and Dereske suggests that the insensitivity of these families and of government authorities have been the major force compelling the two girls to run away from the city and hide in the wilderness. Nevertheless, Augusta herself displays insensitivity toward Erik, ridiculing him for his naivete and his lack of social skills; and she is openly curious about Maag and his ship. Only Erik's insistence upon maintaining the social proprieties prevents outright rudeness.

Wayne Burdick's treatment of Augusta and Willa raises the issue of parental neglect. Although apparently their only living relative...

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This section contains 435 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Lone Sentinel Short Guide
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Gale
The Lone Sentinel from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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