Lavender-Green Magic Social Sensitivity

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Norton deals very honestly and sensitively with the problems the Wade family face over the loss of their father. The move to a new place and the resentment and uncertainty of what will happen next are aptly depicted, especially in the characterization of Holly. While the youngsters' secure home life seems to have been shattered, Lavender-Green Magic strongly affirms the security that flows from self-confidence and the acceptance of others.

Norton asserts that prejudice results from people's insecurities. Because Tamar is different, because she is able to heal others, she is feared and labeled a witch. Although Holly fears racism in her nearly all-white school, it does not occur. Yet the issue itself is discussed by Grandma as she explains what it had been like when she and Lute first moved to Sussex. Further, as Holly notes, an inherent bias, whether racial or social, seems to...

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This section contains 244 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lavender-Green Magic Short Guide
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Lavender-Green Magic from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.