The Last Algonquin Social Sensitivity

Theodore L. Kazimiroff
This Study Guide consists of approximately 22 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Last Algonquin.
This section contains 675 words
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This book displays deep social sensitivity on the issue of what it means to be Indian. Joe and his beliefs are at no point looked down on; rather, in his dealings with non-Indians Joe is shown as having at least as much moral dignity as they do, often more. Also, he is shown as a hard-working and essentially reverent man, especially when he is living the closest to his native beliefs.

Being Indian, in this book, is portrayed as living in a way that would please the Maker, Tchi-Manitou. One way Two Trees does this is by recognizing and appreciating His hand in the world around him. For example, in Chapter 10, "The Hardest Winter", even though an early snow catches Two Trees unprepared for winter, he sees it as more than just a harbinger of the changing seasons: The snow, thought Two Trees, was a garment of great...

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This section contains 675 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Last Algonquin Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
The Last Algonquin from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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