Literary Precedents for Key Out of Time

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Like Tennyson's lotus eaters (in "The Lotus Eaters," 1832), the people who are searching out Hawaika are drifting, giving up: "Perfect, like the rest of this," Ross disdainfully comments on the beauty of the planet. And as it is for the lotus eaters, the never changing, peaceful panorama which lacks human life and therefore conflict has sapped the energy from the crew until they are dispersed and wiped out by the storm. Only the fighters like Ross, Ashe, and Karana survived the disaster. In ancient Hawaika, the Fonatanna are also almost victims of the languid inaction of centuries, which has weakened them and made them a dying race.

Karana, perfectly in tune with nature, has a literary "sister" in the similarly named Indian girl Karana, heroine of Scott O'Dell's The Island of the Blue Dolphins (1960; see separate entry). Like the Indian girl, the Polynesian woman is enough in tune...

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This section contains 167 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Key Out of Time Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Key Out of Time from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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