Jack London Social Sensitivity

Daniel Dyer
This Study Guide consists of approximately 18 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Jack London.
This section contains 1,348 words
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London "recalled that the first time he got drunk he was five years old," notes Dyer. "In truth, I had been poisoned," declares London. From early childhood, London was a heavy drinker, often prone to binges. He recalled nearly drowning while drunk when he was an adolescent—floating off in the currents of San Francisco Bay only to be fortuitously saved. His abandoning his life as oyster pirate and wharf rat was motivated in part by the realization that the heavy drinking associated with that life would kill him at an early age.

Eventually, his lifelong battle with alcohol resulted in his writing John Barleycorn (1913), a story of alcohol addiction that remains a landmark for its realism.

Alcoholism was not the only legacy of London's childhood of hard labor and little education. Dyer emphasizes how London's work in factories and railroad yards left him with an oft-stated...

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This section contains 1,348 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jack London Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Jack London from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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