Writing Techniques in Interesting Times

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Although Pratchett's novel is a fantasy, one crucial technique he uses is that of comedy in an Aristotelian sense. Characters are made farcical, thus rendering them inferior to readers and thereby distancing these readers from the serious undertone of the book. Deformities are made ridiculous—such as Cohen's diamond dwarf teeth—and minor faults are magnified—as with Rincewind's practiced art of running away. Distancing the characters in these ways allows the reader to enjoy the tale and the author to discuss serious social concerns such as oppression of the masses.

Pratchett also uses deus ex machina, but with a twist. Instead of introducing the idea of the gods at the end of the tale to quickly rescue his characters, the author introduces the gods at the beginning of the tale, plainly setting up Fate and Lady Luck to interfere in events whenever Pratchett may...

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This section contains 233 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interesting Times Short Guide
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Interesting Times from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.