Writing Techniques in Homeland

This Study Guide consists of approximately 17 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Homeland.
This section contains 998 words
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Jakes's description of settings and characters and his realistic dialogue pull a reader into the story, establish characterization, and move the plot forward. His most effective scenes are from Paul's point of view because Paul, the photographer, sees people and events as if he is filming them with a camera.

Scenes aboard the Rheinland, as young Pauli sees them, contribute to the immigrant experience, a central theme of the novel. Many European ethnic groups are represented on the ship with different customs and religions, their clothes, the unpalatable food, the storm, seasickness, the smells of vomit, sweat, and feces, and always a few who prey upon the naive and weak.

Paul's confrontation with Mrs. Petigru, his school teacher, who "smells like mothballs," demonstrates with film-like realism the prejudice of some Americans toward German immigrants, even though fifteen percent of Chicage's population is German. "She was a plain, drab woman...

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This section contains 998 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Homeland Short Guide
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Homeland from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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