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Hitty: Her First Hundred Years Social Sensitivity

This Study Guide consists of approximately 12 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Hitty.
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While old-fashioned virtues of patience, endurance, and forbearance are emphasized in Hitty: Her First Hundred Years, there is little concern for major social issues, with a single exception.

During her life in New Orleans, Hitty realizes that Southerners, regarded by her Philadelphia family as enemies, can be as kind and as gentle as Northerners and that they suffered even more during the Civil War.

Even though conscious social concern is lacking, there is little that might be considered even casually offensive.

Some segments of society are presented as distinctly different from the mainstream, but there is nothing derogatory in any of the descriptions. For example, the Quakers in Philadelphia are commendable in every way. The episode at the black church in Mississippi will not offend thoughtful black readers, who will recognize it as an authentic depiction of Southern life near the turn of the century. The primitive tribe...

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This section contains 254 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hitty: Her First Hundred Years Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Hitty: Her First Hundred Years from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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