Hapworth 16, 1924 Social Concerns

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This section contains 210 words
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This narrative takes the form of a verbose, supercilious letter running to 28,000 words, supposedly written by a seven-year-old boy at camp, to his parents at home. The epistle, if it is to be taken at face value, shows the dangerous communication gap that develops between a precocious child and the average-minded parents, who may lack understanding of their child's statements, needs, and psychological danger signs.

The letter also points up the likely difficulty such a wunderkind has in trying to adjust to a world not inclined to receive its enlightenment and guidance from the mouths of babes. This specimen of premature intellectual advancement refers to his periodic "appearances" on earth, as well as to his unhealthy mental condition referenced in examples such as: "a vein of instability" running through him "quite like some turbulent river," his having "left this troublesome instability uncorrected in [his] previous two appearances," and...

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This section contains 210 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hapworth 16, 1924 Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Hapworth 16, 1924 from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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