Gone Fishin' Social Concerns

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This section contains 1,125 words
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In Gone Fishin', Walter Mosley explores the African-American experience in the harshly racist South of 1939. His primary focus is the social adjustment of the novel's narrator Ezekiel Rawlins, called Easy. Although the novel is a prequel to the historical mystery series which features Easy, the character is not the usual shrewd Los Angeles sleuth in this outing. He is a nineteen-year-old observer searching within himself for answers. The quest begins in segregated Houston, where Easy resides at the time.

The limited opportunities open to young men like him are apparent from his job of filling in for a sick gardener.

Easy drops the work when he is approached for a favor by his dubious and idle friend Raymond Alexander, better known to series readers as the violent Mouse. For a fifteen-dollar IOU, and a willingness to forgive the one night Easy spent with EttaMae Harris, Mouse asks to...

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This section contains 1,125 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gone Fishin' Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Gone Fishin' from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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