The Glass Slipper Social Sensitivity

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The tales of Perrault reflect the values of both the French upper middle class and the nobility during the reign of Louis XIV. While these values are not sufficiently different from modern ones to require a lengthy explanation, it is useful to maintain some historical perspective.

Throughout the book Perrault places an emphasis on expensive finery.

Jewels, gold, and elaborate gowns are lovingly described. To some modern readers this feature could suggest an overly materialistic orientation. Greed, however, is always punished in the stories. For example, the covetous sister in "Diamonds and Toads" loses everything. Perrault's tales are set in a society without much social mobility, where it is easy to admire finery without actively desiring it. There is, in fact, an appealing naivete in Perrault's enjoyment of ornaments like jewels.

All of the young people in these tales, especially the girls, think only of marriage...

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This section contains 406 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Glass Slipper Short Guide
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The Glass Slipper from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.