Literary Precedents for Flying Home and Other Stories

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As a student at Tuskeegee University, Ellison read the works of those writers who most influenced young writers of the 1930s: T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, W. B. Yeats, Joseph Conrad, and Gertrude Stein. For Ellison, The Waste Land (T. S. Eliot, 1922) was an impetus to write, and he later described reading Hemingway's Spanish Civil War dispatches, which he admired for their style, especially their vivid descriptions of scene and action. John Callahan observes that "A Hard Time Keeping Up" is almost a reversal of the action in Hemingway's "The Killers" (introduction to Flying Home and Other Stories). The influence of Joyce can be seen most directly in the unpublished story "A Storm of Blizzard Proportions."

The most important philosophical influences, though, were Richard Wright and Edmund Wilson. In fact, Wright not only was Ellison's longtime friend and literary advisor, but he gave Ellison...

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This section contains 153 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Flying Home and Other Stories Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Flying Home and Other Stories from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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