Fire and Hemlock Social Sensitivity

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This section contains 180 words
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In Fire and Hemlock, Jones deals with issues of independence, courage, love, and family life. Polly must develop her independence, and she readily asserts that she is "an assistant, not a damsel in distress." She breaks through gender stereotypes that would have made her fearful of confronting Laurel or thwarting the plans of Mr. Leroy. She also breaks through the isolation of her family life to accept the love of her grandmother and insist on her right to be friends with Tom.

The portrayal of her family life is disturbing. Both parents ultimately abandon Polly and devote themselves to new partners after their marriage breaks up. Her mother is a bitter, lonely woman who blames others for her problems; because of her paranoia and often unfounded resentment, she alienates any people who try to love her.

Granny's love offers Polly a respite, but it does not mitigate the...

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This section contains 180 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Fire and Hemlock Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Fire and Hemlock from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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