The Dark Frigate Social Sensitivity

Charles Boardman Hawes
This Study Guide consists of approximately 11 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Dark Frigate.
This section contains 320 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Dark Frigate Short Guide

Hawes rather backhandedly expresses his disapproval of racial and ethnic prejudice by placing biased remarks in the mouths of unappealing characters.

The sleazy band of pirates, for instance, mocks Jacob, who is Jewish, and an insensitive, foppish "gentleman" aboard the Sybil makes a derogatory racial remark. Many readers may feel that such remarks were best left out of the book altogether.

A degree of class prejudice may be spotted in the contrast drawn between Philip's two romantic interests, Nell Entick and the vaguely sketched Anne Bristol, daughter of Sir John. Nell is portrayed as practical and self-serving, in contrast to the ethereal and refined Anne. In general, however, there is little class or gender prejudice in The Dark Frigate. Hawes shows women, like men, to be victims of their circumstances; Nell cannot afford to be romantic. Furthermore, one character is never elevated above another solely by virtue of...

(read more)

This section contains 320 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Dark Frigate Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
The Dark Frigate from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook