Crazy Horse: Great Warrior of the Sioux Social Sensitivity

Doris Shannon Garst
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Because the U.S. government and the white settlers treated Native Americans so unjustly, any book dealing with Native Americans contains socially sensitive elements. When the red and white worlds collided, a typical chain of events occurred: councils were held and treaties signed; Native American lands were ceded and inviolable boundaries marked; peaceful years followed while more and more white settlers encroached on Native American lands, breaking treaties; Native Americans protested in vain, then fought, and the white victories inevitably followed. A history of the numerous broken treaties between the U.S. government and Native American tribes is available in Helen Hunt Jackson's A Century of Dishonor (1881). Or, as Red Cloud, an Oglala Sioux, said about the white man and his promises: 'They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but they never kept but one; they promised to take our land and they...

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This section contains 693 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Crazy Horse: Great Warrior of the Sioux Short Guide
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Crazy Horse: Great Warrior of the Sioux from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.