The Bearkeeper's Daughter Writing Style & Techniques

Gillian Bradshaw
This Study Guide consists of approximately 5 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bearkeeper's Daughter.
This section contains 131 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy The Bearkeeper's Daughter Short Guide

The Bearkeeper's Daughter, like its predecessor, The Beacon at Alexandria (1986), is well-researched historical fiction that imaginatively presents a graphic picture of a relatively littleknown period. Bradshaw avoids archaic language, and both descriptions and dialogue use a modern style, which successfully evokes the ancient scene.

Unlike The Beacon at Alexandria, this novel does not use first-person narration. Although Bradshaw presents the viewpoint of John throughout the novel, she uses a third-person narrative voice. When she wants to communicate John's private thoughts, she does so in italicized passages. This produces an effective balance of objective and subjective narration.

Bradshaw's approach to historical fiction is somewhat similar to that of Mary Renault, whose novels about ancient Greece use the modern idiom to evoke that culture and its myths.

(read more)

This section contains 131 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy The Bearkeeper's Daughter Short Guide
Copyrights
Gale
The Bearkeeper's Daughter from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook