Ajeemah and His Son Literary Qualities

James Berry
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Anyone who loves literature is likely to notice Berry's elegant yet understated prose style. Indeed, the narrative is related is such dignified, wellphrased English that Ajeemah and His Son provides a good model for someone learning English as a second language; imitating Berry's prose style would form a good foundation for learning to write English well.

Another important aspect of Berry's writing is his handling of dialect. His characters in Africa speak a somewhat grand diction with Atu addressing his father, "My father Ajeemah," and saying, "I thank you, my father Ajeemah."

This elevated diction contrasts with how people speak in Jamaica where the slave dialect drops articles, prepositions, and sometimes verbs. With an ear for language, one can hear the lilting Jamaican dialect reproduced in Berry's Jamaican characters. In his hands, the language is poetic, and it provides a strong sense of locale.

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This section contains 242 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ajeemah and His Son Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Ajeemah and His Son from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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