A Place to Come To by Robert Penn Warren Writing Style & Techniques

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Warren's use of a quiet and controlled autobiographical narrative technique seems to be a deliberate effort to avoid the contrived plots and histrionics of some of his earlier fiction, such as World Enough and Time (1950). The convention of the autobiographical novel is used with an appearance of artless mastery in A Place to Come To, and Warren's command of language has seldom been as sure in his fiction as in this novel.

The characterizations of A Place to Come To attain varying degrees of success. Jed Tewksbury, the narrator and protagonist, is a believable personality, whether as a youth escaping his Alabama origins or as a successful academic. Unlike some of his predecessors in Warren's fiction, he is neither excessively idealistic nor annoyingly wiseacre in his narrative style.

Nearly all the other characters are secondary to Tewksbury, and some of them are treated very sketchily. Tewksbury's friends and...

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This section contains 385 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the A Place to Come To Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
A Place to Come To from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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