Writing Techniques in A Pale View of Hills

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Since A Pale View of Hills is a novel of memory, its structure is a series of reminiscences framed by the present.

The story of Sachiko and Mariko gradually begins to demonstrate more and more relevance to Etsuko's life, until finally, in Chapter Eleven, the last chapter set in Japan, Etsuko's decision to leave Japan and take Keiko is presented in such similar fashion to an earlier conversation with Sachiko's daughter Mariko that the artful blending of the stories finally reveals the true importance of these memories.

Otherwise, true to memory and human nature, Etsuko's story circles around its true subjects, and unpleasantness is often suggested elliptically rather than presented dramatically.

Unless one reads with some attention to detail, it is easy to conclude that this is a novel about nothing; unlike Ishiguro's later novels, Etsuko is not presented with a scene of dramatic revelation which allows her past...

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This section contains 171 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the A Pale View of Hills Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
A Pale View of Hills from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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