Writing Techniques in A Fairy Tale of New York

This Study Guide consists of approximately 8 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Fairy Tale of New York.
This section contains 124 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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All the Donleavy signature techniques from The Ginger Man are repeated in A Fairy Tale of New York, with little development or adaptation. The epigrammatic poems at the chapter ends are often clever, at times brilliant, and occasionally dull. The shifts from omniscient to first-person narrative are more frequent and less effective, in part because of their frequency and in part because the character Christian is inherently less interesting than Dangerfield. Although there is much to sympathize with in Christian's predicament, the whining tone of his recollection of his orphan status and the total lack of introspection about his responsibility for himself and to his fellows do little to offset the objective narrative facts that suggest that he represents self-absorption at its very worst.

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This section contains 124 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the A Fairy Tale of New York Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
A Fairy Tale of New York from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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