A Daughter of the Land Social Concerns

Gene Stratton Porter
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A Daughter of the Land, more than other Porter novels, is concerned with social issues. Most important is parents' treatment of their children.

The daughters of Adam Bates, Sr. work to help secure two hundred acres of land for each of their seven brothers, but none of the sons is given a recorded deed to his land, and the daughters receive nothing more than their trousseaus. In addition, as the youngest daughter, Kate is expected to forego her education, remaining at home as unpaid domestic help so that her father can acquire even more land; when she rebels, her father disowns her.

A second concern is the proper role of women in marriage. Throughout her marriage, Mrs. Bates avoids conflict by yielding to her husband's will, but by acquiescing in what she knows are injustices, she loses the respect of her children. On the other hand, Kate's control...

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This section contains 225 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the A Daughter of the Land Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
A Daughter of the Land from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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