Workers in the Industrial Age - Research Article from Development of the Industrial U.S. Reference Library

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The Workforce Hierarchy

Industry created a tremendous demand for labor. In 1865 there were around 1.3 million people working in manufacturing companies. By 1900 that number had increased to 4.5 million and ten years later it was estimated at about 8 million. Many workers migrated to the industrial towns from the farm-lands of the nation, but even more were emigrating from other countries in Europe and Asia.

Industrial work varied in aspects such as the sizes of the factories or mills and the types of work that laborers performed. However, there were often many similarities. For instance, machines tended by human operators did most of the work. Processes were divided so that each worker performed only one small part of the whole and therefore required little training. Professional managers supervised the work. In most large manufacturing companies, the owners were investors who were not present at the work sites. A...

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This section contains 4,429 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Workers in the Industrial Age Encyclopedia Article
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Development of the Industrial U.S. Reference Library
Workers in the Industrial Age from Development of the Industrial U.S. Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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