Women's Suffrage Movement - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Women's Suffrage Movement.
This section contains 961 words
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Nineteenth-Century Efforts

Before the Civil War, the idea of women voting was a radical concept that threatened the traditional male role as head of the household. In 1848, at the Seneca Falls Convention in New York, activists from the Northeast began a seventy-year struggle for what seemed to them a natural right of all Americans. In the document written for this meeting by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, "The Declaration of Rights and Sentiments," women laid claim to the need for judicial, religious, and civil equality with men. The most controversial of the resolutions held that men had denied them their "inalienable" right to the franchise and that women had a duty to seek the right to vote. By the 1850s, suffragists, sometimes affiliated with antislavery and temperance groups, were actively lobbying at the state level for constitutional changes at the same time that they traveled throughout the...

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This section contains 961 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women's Suffrage Movement Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Women's Suffrage Movement from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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