Women and World War II - Research Article from Americans at War

Angela Huth
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Women and World War II.
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Mobilization

The American high command followed the British model in 1942. In May, the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was created with an ambiguous status, half in and half out of the Army. In July the Navy by-passed the auxiliary stage and created the Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service (WAVES), granting the same status as reservist men. By November the Coast Guard had created the SPARS (Latin motto: Semper Paratus); the women Marines began in February, 1943. In June, 1943 the WAAC became the Women's Army Corps (WAC) and gained full military status. In 1942, society women and women college administrators worked with Congress and the Pentagon to secure necessary legislation; they pointed to thousands of patriotic young women anxious to serve their country in non-combat roles. Indeed, almost all women who enlisted cited patriotism as their primary reason for volunteering.

Women at War

The military hired many...

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This section contains 1,197 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women and World War II Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Women and World War II from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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