Water, Weather, and Climates - Research Article from UXL Encyclopedia of Water Science

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 29 pages of information about Water, Weather, and Climates.
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How Clouds Form

In general, as warm, moist air rises upward through the atmosphere, the air cools. As the air cools, ice crystals or water drops appear and clouds form. Meteorologists (scientists who study weather and climate) name clouds based on how they form, where they form, and the shape of clouds. Cloud classifications are organized into groups or families.

Families and Types of Clouds

The altitudes (heights above the ground) used to describe cloud families change and become lower as one moves from the equator toward the North or South pole. As one moves north or south from Earth's equator (imaginary circle around Earth between the North and South Pole), high altitude family clouds can be observed at much lower altitudes.

High level clouds include cirrus, cirrostratus, and cirrocumulus clouds. These clouds are found at altitudes between 16,000 and 45,000 feet (4,877 and 13,716 meters) above the ground. In comparison, a jumbo...

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This section contains 1,730 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Water, Weather, and Climates Encyclopedia Article
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UXL Encyclopedia of Water Science
Water, Weather, and Climates from UXL Encyclopedia of Water Science. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.