Water Movement - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Water Movement.
This section contains 3,019 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Water Movement Encyclopedia Article

Transpiration

The Causes of Transpiration.

The small pores through which shoots lose water to the atmosphere are called stomata. These pores, which allow carbon dioxide into the plant from the surrounding air, are actually spaces between the cells that make up the "skin," or epidermis, of the shoot. Stomata can be open or closed, depending on the action of a pair of cells, called guard cells, surrounding the pore.

Stomata open in response to the plant's requirement for carbon dioxide in photosynthesis. The carbon dioxide cannot move directly into the shoot cells because the outside of the shoot is covered with an impenetrable waxy coating, the cuticle. This coating prevents the plant from drying out but also prevents the movement of carbon dioxide into the leaves. The presence of the stomata allows for sufficient carbon dioxide to reach the leaf cells mainly responsible for photosynthesis.

Scanning electron micrograph of the stomata on the surface of a tobacco leaf. Scanning electron micrograph...

(read more)

This section contains 3,019 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Water Movement Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Water Movement from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook