Water Movement - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Water Movement.
This section contains 3,019 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
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Water Movement

Plants that grow on land (terrestrial plants) find the materials they require for life in two different locations. The soil is the source of water and minerals to be used for a variety of functions, while the atmosphere provides carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. The root system takes up water and minerals from the soil, while the shoot system, consisting of leaves and stems, carries out photosynthesis. As larger plants evolved, the roots and shoots became increasingly distant from each other, and long-distance transport systems (xylem and phloem) became necessary for survival. Clearly, one of the most important functions of the root system is the absorption of water. How does the root absorb water? Once inside the plant, how do water and dissolved minerals move from the root to the shoot? What happens to the water once it is delivered to the leaves by the xylem? To...

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This section contains 3,019 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Water Movement Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Water Movement from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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