Transportation and Communication Systems in the New Nation - Research Article from Development of the Industrial U.S. Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Transportation and Communication Systems in the New Nation.
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When the United States gained its independence from England in the American Revolution (1775–83), the majority of American colonists lived within one hundred miles of the East Coast. They received manufactured goods, such as clothing, tools, and pottery, from Europe and paid for them with American raw materials, particularly timber, tobacco, fish, and grain. But as the nineteenth century began, available farmland along the East Coast of the United States was decreasing and large numbers of people began moving to lands west of the Appalachian Mountains. There were few roads in the western United States and it was highly expensive and time-consuming to transport goods there. Not only did farmers in the West need manufactured goods from the East, but East Coast merchants also needed crops from the West, and early textile industrialists needed cotton...

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This section contains 3,720 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Transportation and Communication Systems in the New Nation Encyclopedia Article
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Transportation and Communication Systems in the New Nation from UXL. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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